RecoveryBlog

RecoveryBlog - A BLOG FOR RECOVERY ADVOCATES!

Our recovery advocacy blog is produced by individuals in recovery!  Here you will find commentary and personal discussions on different aspects of addiction recovery and advocacy. 

 

BROOKE FELDMAN, RecoveryBlog Manager

Brooke openly identifies as a person in long-term recovery from a substance use disorder.  While recovery means many different things to many different people, what this means for Brooke is that for over 11 years, overcoming problem alcohol and other drug use has enabled her to stop the intergenerational transmission of addiction that claimed her mother’s life at a young age.  Furthermore, recovery has enabled Brooke to combine her own lived experience with professional and educational experience to live a life of service dedicated to supporting others around initiating and sustaining recovery.  Brooke firmly believes that long-term recovery is possible for all individuals and their families, so long as they have access to the resources and supports they need.  Much of Brooke’s professional, volunteer and writing efforts go toward ensuring that those resources and supports are more readily available when, how and where they are needed.

 

 

In some segments of the recovery community, the idea of “attraction rather than promotion” has been transmitted down through generations and generations of people in or seeking recovery. While the original premise of this idea still holds tremendous value, a great disservice has been done by mixing up the original intention of “attraction rather than promotion” with a catastrophically distorted perception of what is meant by the saying.

It is noted that children who live in families in which there is a history of alcohol or drug abuse feel isolated and don't often have the coping skills to deal with their feelings of confusion, anger and a sense of loss.

For many of us involved in addiction recovery advocacy work, somewhere along the way we learned that our stories have power, that our voices have power. As we have taken our advocacy efforts into the realm of social media, we have witnessed the sheer magnitude of reach contained in a single voice. With words, pictures and videos rapidly traveling across towns, cities, state lines and oceans separating continents, we see the extraordinary power contained in our voices. However, as the familiar saying goes, “with power comes great responsibility,” and we must always remember that every time we use our voices, we have the power to either help or harm.

Perhaps more than any other sociological advance we’ve seen over the past decade, the widespread use of social media has had a tremendous impact on the New Addiction Recovery Advocacy Movement. The ability to connect across counties and continents has facilitated the transfer of information and fostered opportunities for networking in ways never before imagined.

I was initially introduced to abstinence-based, twelve-step recovery programs at the age of 13 while in the first of what would be many adolescent institutional stays. I was taught by the professionals involved in my care as well as attendees of the meetings we would be shuttled off to in big red passenger vans that abstinence-based, twelve-step programs were the only way to recover.