News About Addiction, Recovery and Advocacy

If you want to be in the know about what’s going on at our organization, you’ve come to the right place. Be sure to check back regularly to get our latest news updates. 

 


Faces & Voices of Recovery is launching a campaign for people to “check in” as “safe” using a Facebook event page, profile frame or social media hashtag.

The concept of karma holds that one’s fate in this life or future lives is not a random roll of the dice, but a direct product of one’s thoughts and actions. Rooted in many of the great religions and a central motif within Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism, karma is mistakenly confused in popular culture with the idea of good or bad luck. In contrast, karma suggests the presence of a universal principle of justice–that the decisions one makes or the actions one takes or fails to take have inevitable consequences. This principle can be found in many popular aphorisms.

This year, the Office of National Drug Control Policy will be decorating a Christmas Tree in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building that recognizes the reason we do this work - the Americans who are impacted.

“What is the best approach to the supervision of peer recovery support service specialists within the addictions field?” is a question that, at present, remains unanswered.

When I was in middle school, I remember times where I would get frustrated with the “new” people who just moved into the neighborhood. My father who really liked to consume alcohol would spend a large amount of time at the “new” peoples’ house and they would drink, alot! If you would have asked if I would have cared to see the new people years later, I probably would have responded absolutely not.

Well…. I met one of the “new” people 20 years later, and she happened to be my Recovery Coach instructor.

Faces & Voices of Recovery has launched a new pilot program to build the capacity of new and emerging recovery community organizations (RCO’s) through mentorship from well-established, best practice RCO’s that have been nationally accredited through the Council on Accreditation of Peer Recovery Support Services (CAPRSS).

If recovery is more than the removal of alcohol and other drugs from an otherwise unchanged life, then the focus of recovery support interventions should shift from a strict RP focus (a process of problem subtraction) to an RM focus on achieving global health (a process of addition) and increasing one’s potential for a both personal fulfillment and social contribution (a process of multiplication).

The intergenerational transmission of addiction and related problems has been documented for more than two centuries. Put simply, the children of alcohol and other drug (AOD) dependent parents are at increased risk of developing such problems, even when raised in alternative environments. Risks are amplified when combined with other factors, e.g., adverse childhood experiences, early age of onset of drug use, co-occurring medical or psychiatric disorders, enmeshment in drug-saturated social environments, and limited problem-solving assets.

A study from the Recovery Research Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has estimated, for the first time, the number of Americans who have overcome serious problems with the use of alcohol or other drugs. More than 9 percent of those responding to their survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults indicated they had previously had such a problem but no longer did, and a little more than half of them reported accomplishing this with some sort of assistance. Only 46 percent of successful respondents considered themselves to be “in recovery.”

Multiple factors can interact to increase vulnerability for the development of alcohol and other drug-related (AOD) problems in older adults. Those same factors can pose threats to older adults in long-term addiction recovery. In the former situation, older adults who did not experience such problems during their formative and maturing years develop AOD problems late in life. In the latter situation, individuals with years or decades of stable recovery experience a recurrence of such problems with potentially profound or fatal consequences. (The shame from losing long-held sobriety and elder status within a recovery community can be a significant obstacle to recovery re-stabilization.) We have observed four root causes of such vulnerabilities in both circumstances.