Our Mission

We are dedicated to organizing and mobilizing the over 23 million Americans in recovery from addiction to alcohol and other drugs, our families, friends and allies into recovery community organizations and networks, to promote the right and resources to recover through advocacy, education and demonstrating the power and proof of long-term recovery.  Learn more...

  • ARCO Members
    ARCO Members

    102

  • CAPRSS Accredited Organizations
    CAPRSS Accredited Organizations

    9

  • Faces & Voices Community Members
    Faces & Voices Community Members

    66,859

  • Actions by Advocacy Alerts
    Actions by Advocacy Alerts

    1,608

News & Events

The devastating effects of addiction on physical/emotional health and social functioning have been meticulously catalogued, but far less attention has been given to its toll on character and the role character reconstruction plays in the recovery process. A recent rereading of David Brook’s The Road to Character has spurred this reflection on character and addiction recovery.

The Idaho Association of Recovery Community Centers (IARCC) is a consortium of nine recovery centers providing a broad spectrum of recovery support services across the state’s 44 counties (37 of which are rural or frontier). Each center operates with 1.5 staff and a larger volunteer workforce (more than 23,000 volunteer hours across the centers in the past year) with an average $140,000 operating budget. Funding of the centers comes from state grants and private local donations.

An early criticism of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) was that its program of recovery was drawn primarily from the collective experiences of white men and thus unsuitable for people of color. Such declarations have since been challenged by surveys within communities of color indicating AA as one of the preferred choices for people seeking help with alcohol problems, recent surveys of AA membership revealing significant (11-15%) representation of non-White ethnic minorities, and studies of treatment linkage to AA indicating that people of color are as likely, or more likely, than Whites to participate in AA following professional treatment. Also of note are the growth of AA meetings within communities of color and the cultural adaptation of AA’s Twelve Step program within these communities. What has until recently been lacking is a definitive history of the racial and ethnic diversification of AA, including first-hand accounts of how the first non-White men and women experienced AA and attracted increasing numbers of people of color to AA’s program of alcoholism recovery. Glenn C.’s just-published Heroes of Early Black AA marks a major step in filling this void.